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Okay, that ranks pretty highly on the list of things that Phil should have expected and I’m surprised he didn’t warn the others about. Everything being said you now have a sentient AI system that is aware of it’s nature as a simulation and if you introduce certain elements to it (i.e. the scanned archives of real world magic) you’re looking at a potentially very powerful tool with an informed, skilled guardian who can also help manage the simulation and the resources it holds.

Of course what we don’t see in this comic is Kate having to resist laughing at Nami’s reaction or Blue’s accompanying eybrow waggle.

…Um, ladies and gents? Think long and hard about what just happened.

This is not a situation wherein they were told that they had a truth spell on them and they roleplayed it. This is a situation where the simulation just compelled the players (not the characters, the players) to answer honestly, bypassing the filter of their roleplay entirely.

I’m not sure how outside of expectations that should be in-universe, but – regardless – the practical implications outside of tabletops are incredible. They basically just learned that the simulation can effectively administer an honest-to-god truth serum.

And has no ethics whatsoever. Seeing as it just administered a ‘truth serum’ without consent or informing them. Ppl who have NOT been arrested and subject to any court saying they will be subject to it against their will.

THAT kind of AI deserves to be deleted.

Considering it’s a spell in the game that she helped with the design and the implementation of- it’s more of an oversight or bug. Also- it’s for interrogations – in a medieval fantasy world. From their perspective it’s perfectly ethical. If people knew they were under the effects of it- which they are now- they could try to resist it- or choose to not say anything.

The other bug is simple, the game can’t tell what is true or not so its reducing the natural filter a bit to make it easier for people to say what they think rather than what they want to say. It cant differentiate between what a character would say vs a player. That’s a whole other side of “meta”.

If it’s been proven that it actually compels the truth, the actual truth, I’m not seeing how that’s unethical, even if it’s being used without consent. Lying is unethical. A literal truth spell, that forces the person to be ethical… Not seeing how that’s anything but ethical. The need for such a spell wouldn’t even exist if not for unethical minds.

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